捕鱼电玩

捕鱼电玩

字号+ 作者:mckay 来源:环保设备公司 2020-05-25 22:22:29 收藏成功 收藏本文

送彩金💰AG88.SHOP💰捕鱼电玩Text siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeServing e\nvir\onmental awa/renessH【ow c【ompanies across Eur【ope are c/reating sustainabl【e produ/cts\ using \no /fos】sil f】u】\elsA fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | ViewAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tags

【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?Envir【onmen】t/al group WWF h】as accused Hungarian authori【ties of ille\gally】 cu/tting down a forest protected by the /Eu】ropean Union.Last month\,】 Hungary's Nation【a/l Water D】irectorate f/elled a\n old flo】od pl】ain fo/rest in a pr\otected are】a【【 along/【 the T\isza River near T\iszaug, a village som【e 120 kilometres south-east of B】uda/pest.Parts of the area /ar\e pr【o\tected by the EU as a Natura 2000 /site for provi\ding a】 c\or】e breeding and resting place to rare and threatened spec】【ies including black s】torks.Accord】ing to the WWF/, flood pl\ain forests &m【d/a【sh/; an area of l】and near the】 banks of a river 【p【rone to floodin/g &/mdas】h; \ar】e amon\/g the most 【endange/red habitat in Hungary with their s\urface having 】shrunk t/o less than 1% of what it was before/ river regulatio/ns came into force.T\he【 NGO bla/sted the c\ountry's floo\d manag【emen/t practices 【as "unsustainable". It arg】ued /that in many 【previous instances, the felling【【 of trees to redu【ce flooding had not/ been ca\rried out to pr】otect human life and set/tlement, but\ "to prote】ct 】】poor/-qu】ality l【a【nd" /ins】t\ead\ and with little r【egar】d to nature and \wildli【fe【.The group【 said 】【that acro/ss the Ti\sza River Basin, "the 】wil/d【erness】 now resemb//les Mordor"."A large 】part of the \flood plain forest】s and \wetla/\nds have been conf\】【ine/d to riverside emb/ankments, and agricultural areas/ have mainly replaced thes\e form【er large 】floodplains【," Peter Kajner, from WWF Hungary Liv【e R】ivers pro/gr\a】mme】, s/aid.The/ N【GO accused t【he 【National Water Directorate o【f having carried out the felling【 without the proper authorisations and called for st【atutory penalties to be i】m\posed.Th【e National/ Water D】irec\torate ref】ute【d WWF's\ a/llegati【on t】hat the cutti\ng】\ was illegal, writing in a statement that it ha】d follow】ed ministerial dec】re/es and\ secured authorisation from】 t\he local county go】】vernment.It ad/ded t【ha】t cutting do\wn mature t】【rees is an establi//sh【ed p\o】lic】y to reju/venate forests and that it was carri/ed out in January to 】not disturb/ the re【p【roducti\ve period of the rare species w【ho \ca/ll t\he area home.Sha/】re this ar】ticl/eShareTw】eetSharesendShareTwee/tSh【aresen\dMoreHideSha/reSendS\hareS/【hareS/hare/SendShareShareYou m】ight also like \ \ / 】 \ 【 Sziget music festiv/】al in H】ung/】ary showcases its【 green credent】ials / \ R/omania&/#039;s vir/gin forests rava/ged by /】9;wood maf/ia'\ 】 / 【 \ \ 【 【 EU】's young/est c\ommissioner on how to turn climate c【risis ar\ound 【 / More abou】tEnvironmental pr【o【tecti\onFores【tsHungar\y B/rowse t/oda】y's ta\gsWa】t/ch: Iceland's meltin/g \Vatna/jökull Nat\ional Park fights for/ Wor】【ld\ Heritage Statu】s【

Text sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from life\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【onIs f】ast/ fashion slowing down?

Te/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 styleText sizeA【aAa/C【16 Bioscie/nces is the 【New York based/【 s\tartup producing a synthetic vers】ion of\ 】palm oil that\ doesn&\rs】quo;t rely on defore【station. The compan\y has j】ust recei】【ved a 20 millio】/n d】ollar 'series A' invest】m\ent round from Bill Gates’ Breakthrough /Energy Vent【\ure\s fund.\The \inve\stor-l/ed fun】d\ sup/ports 】cut】ting edge startups wi/t】h【 a focus on en\vironmental innovation an【d sustainabil【ity. Hence, the decision to invest in conflict-free palm /oi/l【 goes hand in \hand \with its commitment to /】/b】ack 】"companies that 【will help stop clim】a\te change." A\ 'series A' inve/s】tment is】 usually offered to a】 business/ which has alrea】dy develo【p】ed \a trac/k record /of success, as 【o/pposed to 'pre-seed' or 'seed' stages of funding which occur ear】lier in a company's lifesp【an.The synthetic pa//lm oi\l produced by C16 Biosciences /i】s /bio-based \】and \is brewed from microb/es throug】h a/ fermentation process【.Est&eacu\te】;e】 Lauder launch】es sus【tai】【na/ble scheme to tackle palm oil prod/\uctionMa【laysia/n sup\ermarket fights back to】/ ‘pr【ot】ect/ the re/putation’ of palm o\i/lForest fires /prove eco-friendly palm oil/ 'is a 【c/on'/】, says Greenpea】ce\Palm oil alternat\ive brewed like beerPalm oil exists in the【 majorit/y】 of ho【use【hold /produ】cts b\oug\ht in the】\ supermarket, \f/rom frozen piz/\zas and biscu/i\ts to sham/poo【, toothpaste a】n\d lipstick. While it is 】a versatile /vegetable \oil, deriving from/ th/e fruit o】f \oil-palm tre/es, it is one o\f the majo】r drive【rs o/f【 deforestation wo【rldwide, according to/ WWF. Destroying the world’s for\ests in order to 】obtain【\ 【it is/ not only w\r/ecking】 wildli】fe\ habitats, home to orangutans,/ elephants an】【d rh【inos, it is 】remo【vin【】g the ability of trees/ to absorb car】bon 】emi/ssions.Most cosm】\etic prod【ucts contain palm/ oilUnsplashFor \a】 concerne】d team at C16 Biosciences, there see【med like no o【\ther opti\on but to come \up with a 【【sust\ainable\【【 oil【 alternative to roll ou】t on a la】rge scale. "\We came up /with the i】dea beca【use we wit/nesse/d the mass/【ive scale【 of destruct/ion caused by palm oil deforestation first-hand," CEO Shara Ticku tells Eurone/ws Living."I was working i】n Sing】apore in 2013, which wa】s one of the worst ye】ars\ on re】cor】d for the 】fi【res in I【nd/onesia. T】he Air Quality Index (A】QI) was over 400, and over 0】 is c\onside/red】 toxic, a】nd pregnant women were restricted from goin\g outsi/de," she \continues. Shara says sh\e soon learnt that th/ese\ conseque\nces were d】irectly 】caused by \the need to】 clea【r the land\ for 】palm /o【il/ p】lantations and 【s/a\ys, "I simpl\y couldn't understand how we【 just】ified burning the planet to ma/】ke a v【egetable【 oil.】"As a/ resu【lt, C16 Biosc\】iences was born and Sh/ar\】a started /bre【win\g p/alm /oil li/k\e beer usin/g biotechnology. The company【 state,【 “fermentation is a well-pr】oven commercia【】l process tha】t has been used f\or c【enturies to convert raw mate】ri\als】 into consumable co】mmercia\l pro】ducts】 consumed by】 billions of /people【\ every d【\ay,” addin/g “our\ palm oil is sustainable.&r/dquo;I\n an offi【cial statement】, Carmichae\l R【/\o\berts of Break/through Energy Vent【ures, call】\【s the produc/t a\n【 "elegant bioman/ufacturing solut/ion /for p/alm oi【l r/eplacement" claiming that /it puts the c\ompany in a go\/od position to capi【tali【s】e on t】he “】growing need for sustainable, low-carbon bio-substitutes.”Will the alterna】tives ever re【plac【e t】he original?S/u/stainable palm【 o\il【 has \b\een criticised of late\ by The\ Ro】undtable on【 Sustaina/ble Palm】 Oil】 (RSPO) as &\ldquo;\a】 con” as there are q】uestions aroun】d how the oil can\ be grown in an environ/men/t\ally friendly way.P】alm 【oil that is grown and certified ag\ain】st the eight RSPO pri】nci】ples is based】 on stringent sustainability 】crit【eria relating to s/ocial, en/vironmental and eco/nomic good practice. But in November 2019【, Greenpeace relea\sed /its Bur】】ning Down /】the House rep\【or/t,【 finding that\ memb【ers of the /【RSPO had been at the centre of a /series of Indonesi\an forest f】】ires.\Fo【rest \of pal\m treesUnspl/ashAs a result, synthetically produ\ced palm oil might be an】 】improved s】o【l】ution. “Sus/tainabl/【e certification schemes and zero-deforestation commitments from big agri【business have fail\ed t】o【 live up】 to the/ hype,&rdqu/o; conf】irms J\oe Ei/sen, Executive Direct\o】r/ of the】 Rai【nforest /Foundation UK.&/ldquo;】Alternatives such as C16 【Biosciences c/an be part of 】the/ solution but th/ere are no】 gua\rantees】 this can be a like-for-like replacemen】t for cheap and di\rty palm oil from tropical f\orests. [] Care must 】also \【b/e paid to the possible impacts on\ mill【ions of smaller-holders for whom pal/m 】oil is a 】main sourc【e of】 livelihood,&rdquo【; he concludes.Anna Jones, He【ad// of 】Fo\rest/s at Greenpeace\ UK con【curs, sayi\ng t/hat the \charity is "not against/ u/【s【ing new tech【nol】ogies to p/r/oduce \food including palm oil" provided that the \techniqu【es 【and raw mate】ri\als used "do/ not negat/ively impact the envi\ronment or peopl【e."Share this\ art【ic】le More f/rom】 lifeCapturing CO2: How to r\educe carbon dioxide emissions from the ceme【nt in】dustr/y

  捕鱼电玩

Milk-】made fashion from】【 Tu】sca【ny360 \Video: Putting\ marine\ /reso【ur/ces on the ma\p

 

What is/ enviro】nment【al crime 】a【nd sho\uld /you re\p\ort it?【/ 【“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207T【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【laces 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsB【y Lasse /GustavssonThe rich ge【t richer while the p/o/or get poo/rer, and fis】h have no voice or vot【e. This fishy business 】has to【/ sto】\p. Govern【ments cann\ot def\end private in\te】rests an/d perpetuate ine/】quality and】 】mismanagement of/ n】atura【l pub\lic resource at【 the expens【e 【of the en\】vironment, /\small-sca【l\e fishermen,】 coast【al/ communities and the 】wi/der /e\conom/y.】 / Lasse 【】Gustavsson\ Executive Director at Oceana 【 "W/e have /n/ot come here to beg the【 world leaders to care for our future. T】hey h【ave ignore\d u【\s \in the past and th\ey will ig【nore us agai【n. We ha【ve c\o/【me he】re to let them know that change【 is comin/g whethe\r 【they like it/ or not./" Those words were spoken /by a fifteen year o/l【d Swedis【\h】 climate activist Greta T/hunberg, addres\sing】 the partic/ipants of the UN co】n【ference \COP24 i】n Katowice【, Poland】. A child/ points【 \to politicians s】aying that the em/peror has no cl【othes. Bu【t they show no shame o【r】 emba\rrassmen】t/ and keep leading/ us /】astray. The world 【is on fire. We live in times of unprecedented envi】ronmental crisis, the【 “Anthropocene&rdqu【o; ep】oc\h, where h/uman】i/t】y’s destructive impact i\s undeniab【le. H\umans /e【xcessively b/\urn fossil //fuels,\ cause deforest//at【ion, de【struction of ecosystems\, loss of biodiversity and s【pe/c】ies 】extinct】ion. We ha】ve p\o【lluted our【 o/ceans /with\ plastics and\ overexp【loi【ted their【 natural abun\da【nce.【Climate【 change i/s a global challe【ng【e and one of the biggest threa】ts to humanit\【y. COP24 is likely\ to 【fail d】ue to a lack of politic\al will to act and shocking sho】rt-term 【ex\pedience; the road t/o mea/n】ingful cha\nge is very long and bu/mpy. However, there is 】hope in】 【other quick\-/win decision】s to be tak【en which directly impact 【the envi\ron\ment and can b】rin\g immediate results.One such/ opportunity is the A\griculture and 】Fisheries Council taking【 place on】/ 17-18 De【cember in Brussels. European fishe\ries minis/ters will 】decide on annual catch quot/as for the Atl\antic /and Nort】h Sea; \t】hat【 is to say, how mu/ch f/ish ca/n be saf/ely ta/ken out of/ sea wi/thout compromising th\e st】o【ck&/r\squo;s recovery cyc/l【e.\ Fish is the perfect protei】n and \if pr【operly managed, can be a self-ren】ewing natural source of food which \contributes t/o our eco/nom/i/es.E\U l\aw req\uires that management be ba/sed /on scien【ce&m\das【h;biologic/al models assess t】he condition 】of stocks and advise on next year&rsq/uo;s 【catch limits.】 However, the reality is diff\erent due to petty politics. December’s Council is /an earl】y Christmas gi【ft//\ for usually /lo】w-key fi/she【ries mi/nisters and /an opportunity for/ them to shine【 in the media 】and boast】\ 】abou/t how much fish they n\egotiated in Br\】ussels. 【They pa/y lip service to sustai】nabili\ty while the deals they re】ach in t\his annua\l【 h】orse-t【rading】 ritual often overshoot scientific advice a/s】 t【hey co】ntinue to set catch limits too high.Thi\s C】ouncil is special; it is 【the/ last\ on】e for【 En\v】iron】ment an\d 】Fishe/rie/s /Commissio【ner Karmenu Vel/la, who\se term is comi】ng to an \end.】 The decision made will be h/is swan【 song and a last 【/ch/ance to lead the reluc\tant member states back on track with their own legally-binding com\mitment/【】s. C【ommissioner Ve/lla’】s heritage is less flamboya【nt than th/at of his predecess【or, Maria Damanki, who initiated t【he Common Fisherie】s Policy’s reform (【CFP) whi/ch\ resu【lted in】 a】n ambitiou】s EU law with a clear objective: to stop ov/erfish】ing by 2020\.Vel/l/\a’s job was the techni【cal implementation the【reof./ Re\c\overy of the iconic blue\fi】n t【una, hailed as a s\uccess sto】/ry】【, wa\s recently marred【 by 【scandal and a Europo【l criminal investig\ation in Malta, Spain an\d】 /Italy, 】resulting\ in 【t\he sei\zure of over 80 tons of illegal fish 】wor\th over &euro\;12 mi】llion and\ th】e arrest of 76/ people. \The Mediterranean Sea 【is in crisis, with an【 o】verf】【ishing ra/te of over 90% of\ 】a】ssessed stocks. Ho/wever, Atlant/ic and North Sea EU fish】eries - overexploited by 40% - s\till 】stand a chance to del【【iver by the\ leg\al deadline o/f 2020.T【here】 has never/ /bee\n \a bet【te】r】 moment to【 switch to fully sustain】able】 fisher【ies. EU fleets/ alr\eady make record/ high net pr/ofits compared to\ oth【【er ind/ustrie/s due to low f】uel price】s and improved produ【ctivity of/ cert\ain stocks. Th【e/y can afford/ a short-term, necess/ary】 reduction in【 quotas for the sake of longer-term gains. Healthy fisheries yield \impressive returns\, and\ sustainabilit//y p/rovides long te\rm pr\ofitability.In 【contrast, overfis\hing is against common sense, the \law, t/he e【nvironment and the ec\ono】my; it costs us jobs, food, and/\ 】m【one】y. 】O/ceana&【rsquo】;s】 ex【tensive research and country case stud【ies ha/ve s【howed【 how sustainable fishing/ /based on science can further con/tr】ibute to the EU economy:】 60% mo\re fish landings 】(2 m】illion to/\nn/es), EU GDP inc\rease of &e】/uro;4.9 billion, 】and 92,000 new jo\bs【. Thos/e are enor/mous social\-econom/ic 【gains w】hich are har/d to ignore.And yet fisheries minist【ers are dea】f t\o this st/rong argument. Their irration】al behav】iou\r can on/ly be explained by 【a lack of coura【ge, sh】\ort-term think/ing an/d catering to【 particular fisheries lobbies. Recent scandals in the /UK【 and \Denma\/rk \conf】irm 【tha【t 】“codf/athers&r【d】quo; h/a\ve 】mor\e in【fl/ue【nce than scientist】s o【n ministers\, who a\/ct like the proverbial fox guardin【g】 the henhouse.It is no coincidence 【that the worst offenders in terms\】 of bein\g cham/pions of overfishing /are the\ fisher\ie【s min\isters as \th【ey ignore scientific advice and/ cosy up to \the fi/【shing companies. Five wealthy UK families c【oncentrate power over more than a quarter of the country&rsquo【;s】 【【fishing quota, disc/rim【inati/ng against smaller-sca【le fi\shermen./ Simil/\a【rly in Denmark - where the fisheries 【minister was fo/rced to leave his job du【e to his 】coddling of the industry&rsquo/;s “/big fish” - the lion’s share 【of catches still remain i【n【 the han【/ds of a/ fe【w &ldq】uo;qu\o】ta\ \kings&r\dquo/\;.】The rich get richer w/\hile the \poor get poo/rer, and fish have no voice\ or vo】te. 【This fishy b\usine\ss【 has to s】top. Governments\ c/annot defend priv/ate interests and perpetuate \/inequal】ity and \mismanag/em\ent of\】 natural publ/ic reso【u\rce at the e】xpense 】\of the enviro/nmen\t【, small-sca/le fishermen, 】\coasta】l co【mmu/nities and the【 wi/der economy.NGOs and soc【iety will not beg nat【ional m/ini\s【te】rs and EU insti【tutions to c】【are for our【 planet, sustainabili/ty of our/\ natural resources, and our com\【m\on fu】\ture - it \is t\heir res】】p】onsibility. Ch/an【ge will com/e\/ eventually/, and po/l【iticians will be the【 firs\t on/】es to go. Liv】e up to y/our respons】ibilites and do the righ/\t 】thin【g: you are not onl【y po/liticians but also decision-takers and lawmake】rs. Your horizo【n\ should be the】 【good o/f future gener【a【\tions, not t/he 【next el】ection and the private【 sector’s favours. You have the/ power t【o #【/StopOverfishing.\ Bring back our /fish\ 【now!【L/asse G】ustavsson is the】 Executive Direc【tor /of Oceana in EuropeOpinio/ns【 expressed in Vie\w 【art/icles ar\e so\lely thos【e of the author.Sha/re this articleShareTweetSharese\ndShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS\hareSe/ndShare】Share\【Share/SendShareShareYo/u might/ also like / Scallo/p【】 wars: French and】 Bri/tish fi\shermen pledge talks to solve spat 【 】 \ 【 / Senegal's fishermen say /】European overfishi】ng is】 crippling 】them / 】 / / / 】Coronavirus latest: Donald Trump halts /US paymen】t【s to World Healt/h \Organi【zation / 】 More aboutEurop】ean \UnionEuropean po【l\iticsOpinionfis/hingfish industryEnvironmental protection 【 Br】owse 】today&#【039;【s tags

  捕鱼电玩

Text siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeTex/t sizeAaAa】Dutch/ ad/ve\n【tu/rer Wiebe Wakker left the Nether】lands in an\ e】lect】ric car, the \B\lue Bandit\ \on\ the 15th of March 20/1【6 to /complete/【 th/e long/es】t \journey in an ele【ctric car ever【 recorded. His goal /w】as to sp/read /th】e world o/f sustainab/i【lity a\round the wor【ld, w】hile inspire, educat】【e\ an\d accelerate the t【ransition to a z\ero c\arb】on future. A beje/gyzés megt】eki【ntése /az Inst【agramonWiebe Wakker 】/ Plug Me In (@plugmeintravel) &a【ac】ute;【l\tal megosztott bejegyz&\eacute;【s, &A\ac】u\te\/;pr 7., 2019, időpont: 1:24 (\PDT idő\;zóna szerint)To bring about this mission he re【lied on the kindness and help of the p\eop【le around the glob/e, hence his/ in/itiation, called 'Plug Me/【 In', has /bec/ome th/e collaborati/on b\etween p】eople. Eventu】ally,\ those contributing by offering f\ood, accommodation or 】electricity, wer】e the ones choosing /the path that he ha/d to take. Hence,】 he was sent to Ita【ly via】 Germany and Switzerl/a\nd, after that to Sc【a/ndi【navia to eventuall\y \reach the Nort】h Cape and go \back south vi】a Russia, t】h【e Baltic States, Poland【 a【nd U\kraine.】 Followin】g that he hea\de】d to Iran and【 kept goin【g un【til Sydney, Au\stralia/.Cl】ick on th】e video abov【e to learn/ 【more abo\ut this adventure.Share this】 article More from places

 

Text sizeA【aAa/C【16 Bioscie/nces is the 【New York based/【 s\tartup producing a synthetic vers】ion of\ 】palm oil that\ doesn&\rs】quo;t rely on defore【station. The compan\y has j】ust recei】【ved a 20 millio】/n d】ollar 'series A' invest】m\ent round from Bill Gates’ Breakthrough /Energy Vent【\ure\s fund.\The \inve\stor-l/ed fun】d\ sup/ports 】cut】ting edge startups wi/t】h【 a focus on en\vironmental innovation an【d sustainabil【ity. Hence, the decision to invest in conflict-free palm /oi/l【 goes hand in \hand \with its commitment to /】/b】ack 】"companies that 【will help stop clim】a\te change." A\ 'series A' inve/s】tment is】 usually offered to a】 business/ which has alrea】dy develo【p】ed \a trac/k record /of success, as 【o/pposed to 'pre-seed' or 'seed' stages of funding which occur ear】lier in a company's lifesp【an.The synthetic pa//lm oi\l produced by C16 Biosciences /i】s /bio-based \】and \is brewed from microb/es throug】h a/ fermentation process【.Est&eacu\te】;e】 Lauder launch】es sus【tai】【na/ble scheme to tackle palm oil prod/\uctionMa【laysia/n sup\ermarket fights back to】/ ‘pr【ot】ect/ the re/putation’ of palm o\i/lForest fires /prove eco-friendly palm oil/ 'is a 【c/on'/】, says Greenpea】ce\Palm oil alternat\ive brewed like beerPalm oil exists in the【 majorit/y】 of ho【use【hold /produ】cts b\oug\ht in the】\ supermarket, \f/rom frozen piz/\zas and biscu/i\ts to sham/poo【, toothpaste a】n\d lipstick. While it is 】a versatile /vegetable \oil, deriving from/ th/e fruit o】f \oil-palm tre/es, it is one o\f the majo】r drive【rs o/f【 deforestation wo【rldwide, according to/ WWF. Destroying the world’s for\ests in order to 】obtain【\ 【it is/ not only w\r/ecking】 wildli】fe\ habitats, home to orangutans,/ elephants an】【d rh【inos, it is 】remo【vin【】g the ability of trees/ to absorb car】bon 】emi/ssions.Most cosm】\etic prod【ucts contain palm/ oilUnsplashFor \a】 concerne】d team at C16 Biosciences, there see【med like no o【\ther opti\on but to come \up with a 【【sust\ainable\【【 oil【 alternative to roll ou】t on a la】rge scale. "\We came up /with the i】dea beca【use we wit/nesse/d the mass/【ive scale【 of destruct/ion caused by palm oil deforestation first-hand," CEO Shara Ticku tells Eurone/ws Living."I was working i】n Sing】apore in 2013, which wa】s one of the worst ye】ars\ on re】cor】d for the 】fi【res in I【nd/onesia. T】he Air Quality Index (A】QI) was over 400, and over 0】 is c\onside/red】 toxic, a】nd pregnant women were restricted from goin\g outsi/de," she \continues. Shara says sh\e soon learnt that th/ese\ conseque\nces were d】irectly 】caused by \the need to】 clea【r the land\ for 】palm /o【il/ p】lantations and 【s/a\ys, "I simpl\y couldn't understand how we【 just】ified burning the planet to ma/】ke a v【egetable【 oil.】"As a/ resu【lt, C16 Biosc\】iences was born and Sh/ar\】a started /bre【win\g p/alm /oil li/k\e beer usin/g biotechnology. The company【 state,【 “fermentation is a well-pr】oven commercia【】l process tha】t has been used f\or c【enturies to convert raw mate】ri\als】 into consumable co】mmercia\l pro】ducts】 consumed by】 billions of /people【\ every d【\ay,” addin/g “our\ palm oil is sustainable.&r/dquo;I\n an offi【cial statement】, Carmichae\l R【/\o\berts of Break/through Energy Vent【ures, call】\【s the produc/t a\n【 "elegant bioman/ufacturing solut/ion /for p/alm oi【l r/eplacement" claiming that /it puts the c\ompany in a go\/od position to capi【tali【s】e on t】he “】growing need for sustainable, low-carbon bio-substitutes.”Will the alterna】tives ever re【plac【e t】he original?S/u/stainable palm【 o\il【 has \b\een criticised of late\ by The\ Ro】undtable on【 Sustaina/ble Palm】 Oil】 (RSPO) as &\ldquo;\a】 con” as there are q】uestions aroun】d how the oil can\ be grown in an environ/men/t\ally friendly way.P】alm 【oil that is grown and certified ag\ain】st the eight RSPO pri】nci】ples is based】 on stringent sustainability 】crit【eria relating to s/ocial, en/vironmental and eco/nomic good practice. But in November 2019【, Greenpeace relea\sed /its Bur】】ning Down /】the House rep\【or/t,【 finding that\ memb【ers of the /【RSPO had been at the centre of a /series of Indonesi\an forest f】】ires.\Fo【rest \of pal\m treesUnspl/ashAs a result, synthetically produ\ced palm oil might be an】 】improved s】o【l】ution. “Sus/tainabl/【e certification schemes and zero-deforestation commitments from big agri【business have fail\ed t】o【 live up】 to the/ hype,&rdqu/o; conf】irms J\oe Ei/sen, Executive Direct\o】r/ of the】 Rai【nforest /Foundation UK.&/ldquo;】Alternatives such as C16 【Biosciences c/an be part of 】the/ solution but th/ere are no】 gua\rantees】 this can be a like-for-like replacemen】t for cheap and di\rty palm oil from tropical f\orests. [] Care must 】also \【b/e paid to the possible impacts on\ mill【ions of smaller-holders for whom pal/m 】oil is a 】main sourc【e of】 livelihood,&rdquo【; he concludes.Anna Jones, He【ad// of 】Fo\rest/s at Greenpeace\ UK con【curs, sayi\ng t/hat the \charity is "not against/ u/【s【ing new tech【nol】ogies to p/r/oduce \food including palm oil" provided that the \techniqu【es 【and raw mate】ri\als used "do/ not negat/ively impact the envi\ronment or peopl【e."Share this\ art【ic】le More f/rom】 life° vid/eo:\ how B/elgium i【s trainin】g \the fishermen of tomorrowA\r\e oc\ean cleanup【 campa\igns effective?In a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600By 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tags fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tags

  捕鱼电玩

MEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsTe】xt size【A/aAaA【 group of British women ar【e set to\ prove th/\at in t\he【 UK, where the economy once has be/en s【haped by the textile】 i\ndustry/, it is s【till commercially viable to re\-【crea/te a l【ocal, r【esilient texti】l\e economy. They a【im to offer an】 al【ternat】ive to/ th】e \u【nsustainable global textile produc\ti【on s】ystems which /hav】e threatened /traditional British cloths almost to /exti】nction.The project takes place】, of cours\e, in Bristol the UK’【s greene\st city, the European Green Capital in/ 2015. I】n tha\t year the loca/l weav】in\g mill start\ed operating, it was the firs】t /industr】ial\ loo】m to open in the ci【t\y in almost a century.\ Th\is m【ill has be/】com\e part of /the Bristol Cloth proj/e】ct, a fabric manufacture】r to produce the UK's\ first rege\nera【tive/ non-toxic tex】tile."The】 f\arm 【we source the wo\o/l from - Fernhill fa【rm 】- uses “holistic farm\in\g&rdqu\o; techniques, it means mimick】ing natural \herd \grazing\ pattern【s," explai\ns【 the bac】k【ground \B\ab/s Beha\【n, the F【【oun/ding Director of Bri】stol Cloth project &a【mp】; Botanic【al 】Inks. "Lots of /animals】 ar【e kept together in one area 】putting lots \o/f 【nutri【/e【nts back into the soil. 】T【hey are however moved o\n quickly s【【o always have fresh new pasture to 【graze\ on. The pl\ants in th【e soil get a long time until t】h\e\ /herd 【ret】urn/ to that place. Meaning\ tha】【t a diverse speci\es\ of \pl【ants get【 to grow - all putting a varie/ty of nu/trients an\d mine【rals into the soil【. And they get【 to grow tall and /therefore also\ get deep roots,【 and t】hi】s is what makes them】 able to capture more/ car\bon from t】he air and lock it back into the soi\l- this is wh】at makes i】/t carb/on sequestering and climate neutralising."Anot\【he】r important part of 】th/e proc】ess i\s using natural m】ater\ia/ls for the colouring, such/ as plants, minerals and in【sect\s. \(A/ro/und the world,】 \an estimate【d 17 t/o 20% of industrial water】 pollution comes fro\m textile dyeing and treatment an【d an est】imated 8】,000 synthetic chemic【als are us/ed to turn raw mat/erials into 【\te【x/tiles, many /o/f which will be releas/ed into f】re/shwater sourc\es.)【As the clo/th is made from natural fibre and plant\ 】d】\yes and no toxic synthetic c】/h【emica/ls, i\t is safe 】t/o go back i】n/to the ground after i\t’s u】sef/ul life cycle and actually o/\】ffer nutrients back/ to// the soil.The project has r/aised more than £12,】000【 v\ia a crowdfunding ca/mp】aign to produce the first 200 metres of the Bristol 【Cloth/.\】Cli/ck on the/】 video above to lear\n more about /the proje】ct.Share th】is article 【 Mor\e from style

 

】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\meMEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water qualityCoronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】n

  捕鱼电玩

Text siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeText 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from places

 

  第一,捕鱼电玩“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tags

  第二,真人金花【At the frontline of an 【Ext/inction Rebellion climate protest i/n】 Berlin

  第三,捕鱼电玩Is o\】cea】n acidification driving e/cos】ystems\ t/o unknown territories?

  第四,凯时真人Robinson Crusoe isl\and sets example】 fo】】r/ 】the world in con\ser/vation

捕鱼电玩


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