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时间:2020-06-02 06:39:01 作者:途牛 浏览量:49495

AG88导航网【ag88.shop】澳门凯时官网 eR3nfEWLText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from lifeX12G

y2QRCreating music f【rom garbageAMMF

gOzeMEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsV0lsLBFP

3jc9I【】schia: Ital\ian island at risk of qu\akes or eruptions【 'in the hands of 】the Eternal Father&【#039;NZuK

1N1PText sizeAaAaA\s on【e/ of the o【r\ganisations aiming to】 tackle marine plast/ic pollution, the \S】eychelles Is/l【a【nd Foundation【 has just\ 】released a video 】(click on \the player/ abo】ve) proving that e/ven 【the most remote corners 【o\f the ocean are suffering from the horrors of plastic waste and【 endang/e【red a【nimals. UNES\】CO World He/ritage Sites】 are no exception/. 】It is/ claimed that【 【if the present】 tren/d 】contin/ues, 】oce【ans \could con\tain 】more plastic than fish by 50.\/From bag/s 【to bottles, a/round 13 million tonnes of 【p】lastic flows int\o our oceans eve】ry/ year, acco\rding to a rece/nt UN report. Marine spe/cies ingest or become entangled in plastic de\bris, sometimes cau\s】ing injury or even death. The UN says 100,0/00\ marine animals die each y】ear d\ue to /plastic related causes.On【 many African【 i\slands, /\including the Seychelles, a growing num】/b【er of 【steps】 have bee】n implemented as envi【ro】nm【entalism and tourism ha\ve 】to go hand in hand to protect the /future of th】ese areas.】Click o【n the video【 above to see how】/ \the l\o/cals are abo/ut to s\ave one of the wo/】rld's/ most exclusive \destinations as well as part of 】the /Indian Oc\ean.Share this article】 】 Mo/re from placesprGP

d35jFor many ages, D】anish fishermen have been u\si】ng cl/】inker-built oaken boats, ligh/\】twei/ght and\ flex/ibl】e enough to land directly on 】sand beaches. Thi【s t\raditi】ona】\l 【/wa】y of coastal fishing is considered【 】】more friendly to the marine environment than large-scale \【industri【al me\thods.【But can the boat-b/uilding craft survive the curren【t decli】ne 【of Danis/h\ fishing vi/llages? Fish/ermen and other activists fro】m the Jammerbugt mun【icip\ality of Denmark are \hopi【ng t\o preserve the tradit【ion for at least \anothe\r 100/ years by b\ui\lding 10 new N\ordic 【sea boats for the \young gener/ation of small-scale coastal fishers. Their asso/ciation【, &ldq/uo;Ocean/【 in Balance”, has laun\ched a public cam【paig】n aiming to raise 7/,150,000\ euro【s for th】e boats.【I【n this 360-degree video, Thomas H【øjr【up, the chairman of/ &ldqu\o;Ocean in Balance”, sh\ows us around \a clink】er-built bo\at curren】tly u】n/der cons【truction, exp】laining \the un\ique way the\se boats are de/signed 】and b/ui【lt.【】Journalist name/ • Denis Loc】tierV【i】deo e】d【\it】【or • De\nis 】】LoctierShare this artic/leShare】TweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideSha\reSendSha/reShareShareSendShareSha/reYou\ might al】/so l】ike 】 【 】 \Dan【i/sh fisheries t【ak】】e back 】contro\l 【 】 【 / \ \ 】 How small scal【e fisheries saved Da【nish】 fishi/ng communi【ti【e】s 】 】【 【 \ What’s killing our unde\r】water ecosystems? 【 More abo\ut360° videoFisheryD\e/nmarkEnviron\m\ental protection \ Most 【viewed 】【 】 \ 【 】 】 What 【i//nfluence on climate is the coronav】irus lockdown re】ally having? \ 【 \ / 】 T\he new \AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from】 infection \ / 【【 \Messenger RNA: th【e molecule t\ha】t may 】teach our bodies to b【eat cancer /【】 /【 】 \ \ Apple and Google/ say they【9;ll wo【rk toge】ther to 】trace spread of coron/avirus via smart【phones \ How EU funding i\s c/hanging th\e face/ o【f Latvian\ inn】ov】ation 】 \ Br】owse today�s tag/ssUon

How to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day one

vz5gImage】s of rubbish piling up in the ocean can be a depressing si/ght. But the good news is that 【ther/e are signs \that cleanup campa/igns are hav\i【ng an 【impact.\At the annual clean u】【p event in Marseille, le】ss a】nd less rubbish is being foun【d. Alain Dumort is head of \t【he Europe】an C】ommission Repres\entative Office in M\a】rseille. A pa\ssionate s】cuba diver, he has joined hundred\s\ 【of voluntee【rs making the plunge in【 muddy Old Por/t waters to 】clean u/p the piles\ of trash \a【ccumulated there over the years.Unli【kel】y as it seems, t/he situation here in M/arseille is imp】r/oving. 【 【 】 \ \ 【 / Alai\n 【/Dum/ort】 / \ 【 / 【 \ 】/ European Commission Representati/v/eMarseille 】 \ “Unl/ikely/ as it s【eems,】 the situation here in Ma】rseille i【s im】prov】ing,” he says. “The type of wast\e has chan/ged o】】ve\r the/ three years that we have bee】n co-organising this cleanup event. Why? Beca/use o】ur partners 【- I won’t name commercial bran【ds - are very consc\ious \o【f the problem. They&rs【q/u\o;ve cut/ do【wn on litter, e】spec\ially singl\e\-use pla/stic【, and/ inst/alle\d mor】e waste bins, so there's l\ess and less r】ubbish of /this【 type.&l【dquo;We see othe【r was】te such a】s buil\】ding-site barriers, bicycles and of cours】e electric scoo【ters, 】bu】t l\e\s/s】 and\ less of those too. And that's a p\【retty good【 】sign. Now the【 goal is to】 shift the emphas】is to rec\【ycling】 and reuse【,/ to deal with all the waste that still\ e/xists — that is the \priority.&rdq\uo;Cleanup operation \is a/ glo\bal moveme】ntThe Vieux-Port Pro\】p【re opera】t/i【on is one of 【over 70 similar events receiving fi】nan/c【ia\l and orga【nisational support of th【e #EUBeachCle】anup campaig\n around the globe.】&ldq】uo;This operation is part of a muc】h broader campaign, 】as we, t】he Euro】pean Commission, work】 at the Europea【n le【vel, but】 we also have a global calling," says D/umor\t./ "That's why this EU 【Bea】ch Cleanup c】ampa】i/gn is carried out tog/ethe】r wit【h the United Na【tions./"“Similar\ ope】rations/ are taking// p【lace i\n many co\un\t\ries around\ the world, an/d in】 par\t\【icula【/r【 throughout the Med】iter/ranean r【egion - in Italy/,】 S/pa\in, Algeri】a, in Morocco, Jordan and so o\n. It's a t/rul【y global o\p【eration, 【because we know full well that waste that comes 【for example from 】Eg【ypt, 【will one day end up in Cypru】s, or in It】aly,/ or【 here\【 in the Old Port of Marseille. So t【he goal of this】 campa】ign is to have a Eur/opean, a M】edite/rra\nean and a \global dimens【io/n【.”Share this articleC【op\y/paste the ar【ticle video embed\ \link below:/CopyShareT【weetSharesendShare【TweetSharese【ndMoreHide/ShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSh】are【ShareMor】/e aboutC\o/ntaminat【ion of 【wa】terEnvironment\al p【ro】tec【tionSea 【 / 】 】 Most view\ed 【 / \ 】 【What influence on climate is 【the coronavirus lock【do/wn re/all【y having?】 \ \ 】 / The new A【I/ system safeg/uar\ding premature babies from i【【nfection】 /【 \ 】 Me\ssenger R】NA/: the molec\ule that may t\each our bodies /to】/ bea】t canc/e\r \ 【 Apple【 and Google say they'll work 【together 】to trace spread of coron/avir\us via sma/rtphones 【 】 Ho】w E】U\ funding is changing the face of Latv】ian innovatio】n 【 】 【 Browse t【oday'】s \tagsblV4

uYeiIt【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tagsYyTz

luo0Watch back: 【Greta T\】hunber\g says /she/】9;s not nervous a/s she gets ready for America【s tripCVqG

yLQHThi/s regenerative fabric no\】uri【shes soi】lGeUb

30i4Text sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesBdZW

cdeaText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000More than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ group twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife1YzD

sEdUC】o【uld seaweed be th【e fuel of the/ future/?9uAY

g0FMAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gs5AOY

aW3BFive new ways to help the env【ironmenta37c

6CcY】Du\bai an/d the United Arab Emir/a】tes are making anima\l con/se】\rvation a government priority at a time /when b】iodiversit\【y is unde】r threa\/t /and more anima】l】s fa【ce\ extinction globa/】l/ly.A re】port by the United Nations\ earlier this/ year claim\ed animal extinctio】ns are at an unpr/eced【en【t/ed high. Acco】rding【 to t\he organi】sa】ti\on, as many as one \m/illi【on species are under threat.On a visi\t to t【he 】desert, you/ 】might expect to f】ind ca/mels or】 antelope】, 【m】aybe \some /hawks.\ But Du】ba】i&rs\qu\o;s A】l Marmoom【 animal sanctuary 【】is/ teeming with 】biodiversi【ty with hundreds of differ【ent /species of】 birds, m【a/mmals, and rept【iles】.T【he sa/nctuary covers 20 percent of t】he whole area o/f Dubai. In the begin】ning, 】it\ was a desert popula\ted b/y nati\ve a【nimals, bu\t as the san\ctuar\y【 exp/anded \t】o m\ore than 50 oases, it was discovered/ these water bodi\es/ could cont【rol the environment【al b\alan/c\e.The sa\nctuary has even man】a/ged\ to at】tr【act the Arabian O】ryx. Thi】\【s an】i\mal w【as declared exti/n【ct in t【he w/ild in 1972, but has now been br】ought back from the\ b\r【ink by the reserve.Saoud F\aisal is a wildlife o\ffi/cer \at the】 Al Marmoom sanctuary. He says in the 80s an/d 90s the Oryx /wer】e o【verh\unted for food. Now t】he animal】 is cons\i【dered part o\f the r\egion's wildlife/】.&ld/quo;They are to/tally protected now/ an【d also they are he【althy,” he【 explains. “We have them in【 large numbers whic】h last year reached【 more tha【/n 500."From deser【t 【oases to in\door tropical environments, recent laws in Dubai mean gre/ater g】ove】rnment【al support for animal sanc/tuaries.Laws were introduced in 2007 to cover 【anima\l welfar\e, but awa【reness r】e/ally s】tart\ed\/ to build in 2016/. The laws /also apply to \rare and exotic animals.\ Some are /looked aft\】er in anim/al sanct/uaries like Green Pla/net.Everything about Gree【n Plane】t w】as de/si/gned specifically to 【create 】the ideal habitat for tropical 】p【lants】 a】nd a【n/imals in】 t】he mid】dle of the D】ubai de【ser【t】.The sanctuary house\s a wid【e range o【f /spe/cies including many diffe/rent birds, and ma\mmals such as two-toed】 slo\ths. And lizards l】ike gree/n/ iguanas or basi\lisks.The latest】 addition t/o /the Gree\n P】lanet family is a male Slow Loris /named/ Lo】nely by staff. But t【his wide- eyed, rare pr】imat\e wasn&【rsquo;t【】 lon】ely fo】\r long.As【 he is a critica/lly e】ndangered animal, the search was on to fin/d 【him a compan\ion, \A couple /of months later, a /female【 Slow Loris of the 【【same】 specie【s was also res/cued. These animals【\ mate for 【lif【e 【and\ af/ter they wer/】e int/roduced to each 【oth【e/r【 a【ppea【red to 】get along w/e】ll,【 】raising/ hopes there may 】be a baby Slow\ Loris/ in the near fut\ure.Sh\ar\e this articleCopy/paste the article 【vi】deo 【embed link below:CopyShar/eT\weetShares/e/ndShareTweetS】ha】resendMoreHi/deShareSe【ndSh】areShareShareSe/n【dShareShareYou might also【 like\ 【 【 The appeti/te for local sustainable 】food【 /produce in the Un】/ited Arab Emirates 【 【 】 / / \ \ Dubai acts t】o ste/m the tide of single use pl【astic \ \ 】 【 \ New era 】for Benidor\m as resort embraces sustainabi/lity / /】 / Mor【e aboutEnvir/onment/al prot【ecti/o\nFa\una and FloraD】ubai United Arab Emirates Most viewed Beijing is their cam【\pu/s/: Inside the 【Ch\/in\ese capita【l’s li/fe-c】hanging/ study tour】s \ 【 】 【 \ 9/ places to vi/sit on your cul\tural trip around\ Croatia / 】 The Palm Jumeirah: Dubai's sy【mbol of creati【vit】\/y and ambition 】 Marke【ts,/ coffee an/d stre\/e】t art: d【i\scovering Zagreb's secret delights 】 / Gr【eek is】lands of history and culture 】 \ 】【 Browse/ today's tagsA2BT

gFNFM\apping /the 【Arctic\ sea lifeayEg

PuTu\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】changeUHtU

DM5EWhat if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagspdGM

GJLqOcean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tagslxkr

1.cXXdFrom Amsterdam】 to Sy【dney on el【ec/t/r\icitywCjl

2.Wd5Q【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?KPKy

3.BqcRTo【r\re Guaceto, a】n eight-kilometre long stretch of coastli【ne north-west of Brindisi, used to be【 know/n as a centre for poor fishing practic\es, black market smuggling and /a drop-off point 【for illegal immi\gration.Now it's famous around t【he world for the【 way 】it's t【ransf/ormed itsel】f.The coast i【s n】ow a\ p\rotected mar【ine 【re\serve and s【trict】 rules are in /place so that /tourism\ and fishin/g don’t】 har】m the nat\ural env\ironment.The【 European Uni】on】 h\as comm\itted to se\t aside 10 per ce/nt o【f【 all i】ts waters as 】marine protecte【d\ ar\eas by 2020. This targ/et was met two y】ears before the d//eadline. Today, 62】5,000 squa【re kilometre/s of marine and coastal waters in Europe are protected, which 【is 【expected to bring【 m/ore than 3 billion euros of annual benefits.In/ 2/001, Torre Guaceto imposed a 【/five-yea/r ban 【on f/ishi】ng to rebui【\ld the ca/\tastrophic\all【y declining s/tocks. To】day, a fe\w loc【als/ are permitted to fish fo\r j】ust one day a wee/k, usin】\g n】ets that c】an’t catch】 small fish.Fisherma【n Cosimo De Bi\asi to【ld 】Ocean/: 】【“Be/\f】】ore the r/eserve w【as\ /establish/ed, this 】whole area was rife 【with dyna】mite fish/i】ng/, cigaret【\te【 smuggling and illegal immigr】a/nts. Today, thanks to /the p【r\otected area, all we can see here is th】e pristine sea.”The protecte【d area is man\aged by【 a consortium \that represents【 local communities and/ the/ World Wide Fu【nd for Natur】e, th】e// WWF.It enf/orces the rul】es that have【 been \agreed with \the fish\ermen. Th【at \includes monitoring the\/ir catches to ma\k【e su/re that the pr】otection e】ffor\【ts are 【effective.And the fishermen are happy with【 the new controls on what t/\hey catch.“When we ca\t】ch a big fish an\d brin/g i\t ashore, we can sell【 it n【ot for f/\ive eur/o/】s, but for】 /20 【to 25 euros,&r】【dquo; De Biasi said.Francesco \de Franco, head of t【he envir\onmental an【d technical unit at the Torre Guaceto con\sortium, said fish stocks h\a】ve recovered in the marine reser\ve.&l】dquo;O【utside the protect\ed area, the levels of\ fish /rem\ain basically the same】 as in the past. And in\s】ide this are\a, the \fis/h /s】tocks have rough【ly doubled,\" h】e \said.Wider be/nefitsAnd /it’s no】t just the sea that&rsquo\;s【 being protected. The dunes and we【t【lands along t】he/ coas\tline are a precious stop-off point for migratory bi/rds】 and a perman【【ent 】home to m/any l/ocal /spec】【ies.\The Torre /Guaceto area, named after its 】centuries-ol\d watchtowe】r, is patrolled day \】and ni】ght by the coast guard and 】the police. They】 【say most danger toda【y comes【【 from careless visito【rs w\ho might pick plants or damage coral\ near the shor\e.To/urists\ who re/spect the environment are welcome).In the p【ast, these sandy beaches were 【f\ull of litter and overcrowded. 】】Cleaning up the area, 】introdu\c】ing 】guided t/our\s and【 l\imiting car a】ccess\ made a 】big diff【erence: now, 【in peak】 season,/ Torre Guaceto /gets】 visited /by 5000-6000/ tourists a day.Mimmo Miccoli fro】m Bres/cia has been visiting for years.&ldq\uo;This /place used to be a m】ess, wi】th/\ cars parked every/where,"\ /he told Oce】an. "Now, all the cars have to /be l/eft in the car /pa【r【【k at th\e\ top of t\he roa\d /—【 /】so the pl】ace is 【no/w much 【nice/r, cl/eaner\.”The \f\low of tourist\s 【also bene【fi【ts businesses that have embraced the】 t\rend for sust/ainability.Ma】ria\ Lanz【il/otti 【runs a restaur/ant in nearby Car/ovigno which s/pe\cial【【ises in lo【ca【l orga/nic cu\isin】e.&l【dquo;We always/ have fresh, good, healthy fish from the se【a," /she said. "And ou】r lan】d produces lo/ca/l toma/toes and so on, so it is very import【ant \for me and for all of us restaurateurs /to have this natural \【res【erve — it’s our marvel!&rdquo/;Backed by European f\unds, o/ne-thi【rd of 】local farms have n\o/w conve\【rted to【 organic productio/n, boos】ti【ng 【the【ir sales by associati/ng their brand【s with the n】ow fam\ous Torr】e Guaceto pr\otected【 area.E】stablished to preserve the environment, this marine protected ar【/ea became an attractive/ ec\o-】tourism destinat】ion with a/ sus/tainabl】e econ\omy &mdas\h; a success story th】a】t\ expert/s say should serv/e an example to othe】r places 】like Torre Gua/ceto/.Ni】co】lò Carnimeo, 【vice-presid【ent of the Torr】e Guaceto mana【gement consortium, \s/ai】d:【 “I \would\ say【 t】hat protecting 10 per cent of 【Eur【ope’s waters is st\ill not eno【ugh — we sho\uld go further, keepi】ng in mind the s/o-called /circ】ul】ar eco】nomy, l\ike wh\at we ha【ve he\re. Thi/s does work, and I would say thi】s is how i【【t should be d】one in other mar【ine protecte】【d areas 】too.&r【dquo;1212121212【/1212Sha/re thi】s articleCopy/p】ast/e the article video embed link】 below【【:CopyS【ha】re\TweetSh\ar【esen/dShar/eTweetS\haresendMoreHid/eShareSendShareShareShareSendSha【reShareYo/u might al【so lik\e 】 / \ Sea ch/an/ge: how 】one 】small】 stretch of coastline in Italy tr】ansfo】rmed itself 】 /【 More aboutEnviro【nm】ental protec【【tionFauna and FloraFisherySea 【 \ \ Most /】v【iewed 【\ \ 】 What in/fluence/ on c【li【mate】】 【is \th\e coronavir】\us】 lockdo\wn r【eally having? 【 / / 【 \ 【【 】 The new AI system sa】feguarding premature ba】bies \from infectio】n 】 \ Messen】ger R】】NA: the molecule that may te【ac/h our bodies to beat cancer / 】 Apple and 】【G\oogle say they'll work together to tra/】c\e spr【ead of c/oronavirus via【 smartphones 【 / / / How】 EU fun\d【ing is【 changing/ t】he face o\f Latv/ian innovation/】 / \ 【 / 【 Brow【se today'/s tagstJEa

4.2zrEText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from lifeM1WP

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f2tQSea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \rdoT

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wd0KText sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【styleXs64

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OSrPIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gssVsg

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WSnS/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/si4g2

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YMifTe】xt size【A/aAaA【 group of British women ar【e set to\ prove th/\at in t\he【 UK, where the economy once has be/en s【haped by the textile】 i\ndustry/, it is s【till commercially viable to re\-【crea/te a l【ocal, r【esilient texti】l\e economy. They a【im to offer an】 al【ternat】ive to/ th】e \u【nsustainable global textile produc\ti【on s】ystems which /hav】e threatened /traditional British cloths almost to /exti】nction.The project takes place】, of cours\e, in Bristol the UK’【s greene\st city, the European Green Capital in/ 2015. I】n tha\t year the loca/l weav】in\g mill start\ed operating, it was the firs】t /industr】ial\ loo】m to open in the ci【t\y in almost a century.\ Th\is m【ill has be/】com\e part of /the Bristol Cloth proj/e】ct, a fabric manufacture】r to produce the UK's\ first rege\nera【tive/ non-toxic tex】tile."The】 f\arm 【we source the wo\o/l from - Fernhill fa【rm 】- uses “holistic farm\in\g&rdqu\o; techniques, it means mimick】ing natural \herd \grazing\ pattern【s," explai\ns【 the bac】k【ground \B\ab/s Beha\【n, the F【【oun/ding Director of Bri】stol Cloth project &a【mp】; Botanic【al 】Inks. "Lots of /animals】 ar【e kept together in one area 】putting lots \o/f 【nutri【/e【nts back into the soil. 】T【hey are however moved o\n quickly s【【o always have fresh new pasture to 【graze\ on. The pl\ants in th【e soil get a long time until t】h\e\ /herd 【ret】urn/ to that place. Meaning\ tha】【t a diverse speci\es\ of \pl【ants get【 to grow - all putting a varie/ty of nu/trients an\d mine【rals into the soil【. And they get【 to grow tall and /therefore also\ get deep roots,【 and t】hi】s is what makes them】 able to capture more/ car\bon from t】he air and lock it back into the soi\l- this is wh】at makes i】/t carb/on sequestering and climate neutralising."Anot\【he】r important part of 】th/e proc】ess i\s using natural m】ater\ia/ls for the colouring, such/ as plants, minerals and in【sect\s. \(A/ro/und the world,】 \an estimate【d 17 t/o 20% of industrial water】 pollution comes fro\m textile dyeing and treatment an【d an est】imated 8】,000 synthetic chemic【als are us/ed to turn raw mat/erials into 【\te【x/tiles, many /o/f which will be releas/ed into f】re/shwater sourc\es.)【As the clo/th is made from natural fibre and plant\ 】d】\yes and no toxic synthetic c】/h【emica/ls, i\t is safe 】t/o go back i】n/to the ground after i\t’s u】sef/ul life cycle and actually o/\】ffer nutrients back/ to// the soil.The project has r/aised more than £12,】000【 v\ia a crowdfunding ca/mp】aign to produce the first 200 metres of the Bristol 【Cloth/.\】Cli/ck on the/】 video above to lear\n more about /the proje】ct.Share th】is article 【 Mor\e from stylekM34

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wpvl\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tags2UX8

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u0g7The world's highest/-op\erating\ weather st\ations have been installed on M\ount\ Everest, a【ccording to th】e Nation【al Geogr\aphi【c Society. The】y \were placed 】at 8,4/30\ metres and 7,945 metre【s as part \of a three-mon/th scien/tific】/ 【assessme\nt of\ the planet's t/allest peak.The expedition t】eam set o【ut to Everest to gain a deeper understanding of/ t】he/ 【effects of cli】mate change on t【he Kara【koram\ glacie\r/ r】【ange. Due to【 increasing global temp【eratu【res, t\hese glaciers have b【een rapidly disap】pearing, sa\y the scientists.【The/ geol】ogy team from Nat【ional Ge【【ographic【 and Rolex's【 Perp\etual Planet Extreme Expediti/onNATIONALGEOGRAPHIC/FREDDIEWILKINSONNATI/ONA/LGEOGRAP】HIC/FREDDI【EWILK\INSONTh【e extreme weath\er conditions ra】vaging this 【region\ has m\ad【e studying th【e effects o/f】 climate cha\】nge \on】 the are【a accurately nearly impossible. Th\e rese】arch completed on the expedi/tion "will fill critical data g】aps on the【 world&【rsquo;s life/ support sy】stems and drive solutions\ to /assur】e tha】t they c\a】n c/ont\】inue to fuel our future,&rd【quo; says executive director /Jonath\on Baille./A】 night wi【nd spins an anemometer\ at a 【weat/h\er stati/on installe】d during Nati【onal/\/ Geog/rap】h】ic 【a\nd Rolex's 2019 Perpetual P】l\【anet Extreme Exp\edition to Mt. Ev\erest/NATIONAL】GEOGRAPHIC/ERICDAFTNATION【AL/【GEOGRA\PHI/C【/E【RICD\AFTTo und【ertake /the stu\dy, cl//imate scientists researched bi】olo【gy, geology,【 glacio\l【ogy, map【ping,】 and\ meteorology in /the Karakora】m range. The】se fields of science, they \believe, are the most critical in understanding the e\ffects of cl【imate c/hange on t【he env】iron【ment.A total】 of five weather stations were installed on Everest/ and l/ive updates from the station are available at the Nati\onal Geo/graph【ic webs【】ite.Share this articleShareTweetSharese【ndShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShare\S/hareSendShareShareYou mig【h/t 【als/o lik\e 】 Watch/: River of clouds descends on Alpine valley【 】 \ 】 \ 【 / \ New coronavirus /not the 】\real killer: 【\it\&#】】039;s the pat\ient s 】im】\mune system\ damaging vital organs 【 】 】 】 /\ /France w/arn/s of serious side ef\】fects of c\oronavirus ‘miracle cu/res’ / 【 \ / 【 / M/o】re aboutClima/teScience/Environmental protectionWea】therHot TopicL/earn more about Clima\te Hot TopicL/earn more ab\out 【Climate 【 】 Brow/se tod\ay&【#039;s tags1oow

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